“Dementia and Church” Caregivers with Hope withPeter Rosenberger and Tracey Maxfield

When we try to attend Church, it seems something ALWAYS goes wrong!”

When caring for someone with dementia, isolation develops as an increasing challenge for family caregivers.  Many caregivers feel cut off from places of comfort and community, such as attending church. A number of frustrating and embarrassing mishaps can await most caregivers and their loved ones, so the seclusion increases.

Yet, pushing back against that isolation benefits not only the caregiver, but the loved one with dementia as well.  Churches and places of worship provide great comfort, strength, and community to a family living with a member suffering from dementia.  Attending those places for a long as possible helps both the caregiver and the loved one with dementia. While caregivers valiantly try, it takes a bit more than effort to make it a positive experience for the caregiver and loved one.  It takes a bit of planning and communication.

Tracey Maxfield, Dementia Expert

Tracey Maxfield Email: infirmier at outlook.com

Dementia Care expert, Tracey Maxfield, RN, serves as a regular contributor to our radio show for caregivers.  She recently provided several tips when taking a loved one with dementia out in public—and specifically to church.

With a little planning and upfront communication with church leaders, Tracey  shares that a trip to a house of worship becomes a meaningful experience instead of an ordeal.

 

A few of Tracey’s tips:

  • Before leaving the house, make sure you have an ID bracelet for your loved one.  If you don’t want to do a bracelet, print off cards with the patient’s name, a contact number, as well as an address.  In addition, it’s advisable to add, “I suffer from dementia, please stay with me until we find my caregiver.”
  • Take along a bag with water, a snack, and clean clothes.
  • Be last in and first out.

Peter SpeakingAbout Peter Rosenberger

A thirty-year caregiver for his wife, Gracie, who lives with severe disabilities, Peter Rosenberger understands the journey of a caregiver as few do.  His experience led to him to author four books including Hope for the Caregiver, and 7 Caregiver Landmines and How You Can Avoid Them.  

Peter Rosenberger’s radio show for family caregivers airs each Sunday at 3PM CDT on Newsradio 1510 WLAC.  In addition, the show is also syndicated through the Truth Network.

A 2nd Dan (degree) black-belt in Hapkido, Peter is also an accomplished pianist.  He recently released his new CD, Songs for the Caregiver.  

 

Brian Kursonis

Related Articles

PET scan of the brain for depression

PET scan of the brain for depression A PET scan can compare brain activity during periods of depression (left) with normal brain activity (right). An increase of blue and green colors, along with decreased white and yellow areas, shows decreased brain activity due to depression. Picture of PET Scan used

Read More »
Guest Mental Illness Articles
Tracey Maxfield

The 5 Stages of Grief and Bereavement: Overcoming Loss by Jake Irving

“Grief is itself a medicine.” ~William Cowper Grief as defined by Merriam-Webster is: (a) a deep and poignant distress caused by or as if by bereavement (b) a cause of such suffering. But the truth is, it is so much more than this. Grief and bereavement have been studied throughout the years

Read More »
ENGAGE EDUCATE EMPOWER with Dr Suzanne Henwood
Engage Educate Empower Podcasts
Tracey Maxfield

ENGAGE EDUCATE EMPOWER episode 2 with Dr Suzanne Henwood

Suzanne started her professional life as a diagnostic radiographer, her area of expertise was trauma, but over time she wanted to have a greater influence in improving patient care and service delivery and so she moved into education. A long career in higher education culminated as an Associate professor in

Read More »

Vancouver Sun Book Review by Thomas Sandborn

Book review: Escaping the Rabbit Hole tells of B.C. woman’s battle with depression Okanagan Valley nurse Tracey Maxfield tells her tale of recovery from acute depression with this book, based on journals and a blog she created during the worst of her illness. TOM SANDBORN Updated: June 6, 2018 Review

Read More »